All the things I am

Los sujetos de una verdad artistica son las obras que la componen (Alain Badiou)

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

(Source: vintagegal, via the-dark-city)

Daisy and Harry Earles have a disagreement - “Freaks” (1932)  dir. by Tod Browning

(Source: the-dark-city, via the-dark-city)

houghtonlib:

Title page with vampyric punctuation, the semicolon evoking a bite-mark with a drop of blood.
Polidori, John William, 1795-1821. The vampyre : a tale. London : Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1819. EC8.P7598.819va (A). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

houghtonlib:

Title page with vampyric punctuation, the semicolon evoking a bite-mark with a drop of blood.

Polidori, John William, 1795-1821. The vampyre : a tale. London : Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1819. EC8.P7598.819va (A). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

universalmonsterstribute:

Dracula (1931)

universalmonsterstribute:

Dracula (1931)

nprbooks:

In Wes Anderson’s latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It’s about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there’s a credit at the end that reads: “Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig.”

Last month, Anderson told Fresh Air's Terry Gross that until a few years ago, he had never heard of Zweig — and he's not alone. Many moviegoers share Anderson's past ignorance of the man who was once one of the world's most famous and most translated authors.

George Prochnik is out to change that. His forthcoming book is called The Impossible Exile: Stefan Zweig at the End of the World. Check out his conversation with NPR’s Robert Siegel here.

(via npr)